Friday, 17 May 2013

Loom Knit Tea Cosy

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While most people seem to have delicate little tea pots, mine seems huge in comparison.  I think it perhaps says a lot about my penchant for tea, but a tea pot this big really does require a cosy to keep the contents warm as the pot is slowly drained.

Rather than knit a cosy in the usual way, I thought I would try making one using a loom/knifty knitter.  They are wonderful at creating round shapes and it was only the really-quite-easy-but-seems-quite-tricky process of making slots for the handle and spout that is anything out of the usual.

As the finished item generally ends up being slightly smaller than the loom it's knitted on, I chose the loom that best fitted my pot, in my set this ended up being the green loom, but I know this can vary depending on manufacturer.  The yarn is Bella Baby Buttercup, which I've used before and love its softness and pastel shades.  It's a 4ply baby weight and this project is knitted using two strands together and I decided on pastel lavender and pink.

For my cosy I started with Five rows of Rib Stitch and then the rest of the cosy is knitted in one row of e-wrap, one row purl.  We have links to some wonderful video instruction for casting on and rib stitch in our blog post Knifty Loom Knit Leg Warmers.

Once the rib and first row of e-wrap are complete, it's time to make the holes for the spout and handle.  At the horizontal peg, rather than continue knitting, reverse and using purl stitch go back over the stitches from the last row, until you reach the peg directly opposite the horizontal peg/ (eg.  I knit going to the right of the loom, so at the marker peg I stop and reverse, meaning I'm now knitting to the left of the loom. and continue halfway around the loom before stopping.  You are essentially going back and forward on the loom, rather than knitting in the round.  Once you have knitted one half of the cosy - the length should be enough to reach the brim of the teapot, detach the wool (you can sew in the ends later) and attach to the other half of the cosy and knit in the same way.  Once both sides are equal it's time to knit in the round again.  Complete enough rows to ensure the top of your pot will be completely covered.

To cast off, cut the yarn leaving enough to thread through each stitch of the loom, with a little extra.  Using a large needle, sew through each stitch on the loom, detaching it from the pegs as you go.  When every stitch has been threaded, gently  pull the yarn until the top has closed.







 


To decorate, I used some flowers made on a flower loom kit - I love that it's so pretty and feminine and just a little bit shabby chic.

Happy loom knitting 

Deb




Other FitzBirch loom knit projects:
Knifty Loom Knit Leg Warmers
Loom Knit Gauntlets
Loom Knit Market Bag
Loom Knit Remote Control Holder
Loom Knit Socks
Charity Knitting



Disclaimer: We are all part of one big crafting community so please do not sell our patterns or claim them as your own. You are free to do what you wish with finished items but if you sell them online, please link back to us for pattern credit. Please use your own images if advertising an item for sale from our patterns.  We are not expert pattern designers and believe knitting and crochet is a wonderful art form.  Therefore, many of the ways we create things may not be according to established methods.

19 comments:

  1. Wonderful!!!
    I'm your new follower!
    http://freestilcreatingbyvilly.blogspot.gr/2013/02/3-picushion3.html
    have a great weekend!

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    1. Thanks so much for visiting Anastasia!

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  2. Really cute! Thanks for sharing at Submarine Sunday!

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    1. Thanks T'onna - love all the projects that were linked up this week.

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  3. What a gorgeous tea cosy! I love the flower embellishments!

    Thanks for linking to a Round Tuit!
    Hope you have a fabulous week!
    Jill @ Creating my way to Success
    http://www.jembellish.blogspot.com/

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    1. Thanks for hosting Jill - we really enjoy looking through all the wonderful projects that others link up.

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  4. love this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I'm hopping over from Jill's blog hop. Hugs!

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    1. Thanks for the visit Katherine - What a great blog you have, I'm loving the concept of wordy wordless Wednesday!

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  5. Oh, I love this!! It is absolutely beautiful. Just pinned. Thank you so much for sharing at A Bouquet of Talent. Hope you are having a great week.
    XO
    Kathy

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    1. Thanks so much Kathy. We really look forward to A Bouquet of Talent every week.

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  6. A few questions before I begin this fab project:

    You say to "detach the wool" when working the spout and handle. What does that look like? Detach from what? How does one do that without unraveling the whole project?

    Teas cosys (cosies?) are are to find in the US, so I hope to make a few of these :)

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    1. Hi Stephanie

      Thank you for your comment. Just cut the wool leaving enough length to weave/sew in the ends when you have finished the project and also the length should be long enough so that it doesn't start to unravel.

      Hope that this helps - Deb

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  7. Hi I'd like to know if this pattern would work on a smaller round teapot as well.thanks

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  8. Hi I'd like to know if this pattern would work on a smaller round teapot as well.thanks

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    1. Hi Alan, Thank you for your message.

      The loom knit cosy is quite stretchy so I believe it would fit a number of teapot sizes. If you have an adjustable loom, using a smaller amount of pegs may be of benefit. Deb

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  9. Hi again I am having a problem following the written directions.Is it possible for you to post a video for this please.Thank you

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  10. Hi again I am having a problem following the written directions.Is it possible for you to post a video for this please.Thank you

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